Whether you’re pregnant, recently given birth, or breast feeding, chances are you’re experiencing hot flushes and excessive sweating, particularly at night.

Fluctuations in hormone levels are to blame for nearly 90 per cent of post partum women and ten per cent of pregnant women experiencing night sweats, not dissimilar to menopause.

Wendy Eade, mother of four, and creator of Eaden moisture wicking sleepwear says she is constantly inundated for requests for her moisture wicking sleepwear from pregnant and breast feeding women.

“I originally created Eaden Sleepwear when I went through menopause and was experiencing terrible night sweats. It wasn’t unusual for me to change our bed sheets a couple of times a night!

“I specifically designed Eaden Sleepwear to combat night sweats and over heating. My entire range is made from Dri-Release fabric which is scientifically proven to draw moisture away from the body and leave you feeling cool and dry. Freshguard treatment embedded in the yarn also eliminates odour.”

“After the success of Eaden Sleepwear for menopausal women I began designing sleepwear suitable for a younger market, especially pregnant and breast feeding women.

“The fabric in Eaden Sleepwear is so soft and stretchy it will expand with your waistline and then retract when you do! A number of garments also have a cross over top for breast feeding,” says Wendy.

Postpartum sweats

It’s common to perspire a lot in the weeks after giving birth, especially at night. Sweating is one of the ways your body gets rid of the extra water you retained during pregnancy.

Your kidneys are responsible for most of the purging, which means you’ll be urinating more than usual for the first week after you give birth. But your pores also work overtime to shed the extra water.

The emotional stress of new motherhood can also cause excessive perspiring. It’s also thought the dramatic drop in oestrogen that occurs right after delivery also contributes.

Breastfeeding sweats

Even after the water weight is gone, you may continue to sweat more than usual if you’re breast feeding.

As with pregnancy, it is important to recognise the difference between normal breast feeding sweats and a fever which may indicate infection such as mastitis, or infection of the mammary glands.

Anything over 38 degrees Celsius is considered a fever and medical advice should be sought immediately.

The full range of Eaden Sleepwear including garments perfectly designed for lounging and walking around hospital or home is available on line and at selected lingerie outlets Australia wide.

For stockists details and online orders go to www.eadensleepwear.com.au or telephone 1800 209 204.


  • Great to hear about products like these

    Reply


  • I have some new friends who are suffering with HOT FLASHES and I tell the to visit Eaden Sleepwear. They love their garments. I love mine too!

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  • What a brilliant idea. I always felt so uncomfortably hot during and after pregnancy and then breastfeeding.

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  • Fantastic ideas, thank you heaps:)

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  • It didn’t matter if it was hot or cold, pregnancy always amplified the temperature to the point of crazy discomfort for me.

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  • great info oncrained here, thanks

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  • Oh I dont think I had any of these sweats.. I could’ve just wiped them from my memory though…

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  • I enjoyed reading this, thank you for sharing.

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  • My main tip is to not buy too many expensive feeding outfits, you will end up wearing a lot less than you intended!

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  • Thanks a lot for sharing. I enjoyed reading it.

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  • wish i saw this 2 years ago!

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  • breastfeeding sweats- you can see why breastfeeding helps you lose weight!

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  • Also, the longer you breastfeed the better you are at it :) First time is always a bit of clumsiness and mess but you get there!

    Reply


  • Some good advice – thanks for sharing.

    Reply


  • thanks for sharing these great ideas and tips.

    Reply

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