A mum has asked why dads are not allowed to stay on the post-natal ward with their partner and baby after the birth…

UK journalist and mother Annie Ridout has taken to Twitter to ask why many hospitals don’t allow fathers to remain in the post-natal ward with their partner after they’ve given birth. Annie said she believes the rule is ridiculous and fails to reflect the importance of a father’s support and presence for both mum and baby.

Just Not Fair

Annie said she began questioning the hospital policy after her own birth experience. “My local hospital doesn’t allow partners to stay on the post-natal ward after their baby has been born,” she tweeted. “I think this is outrageous – unfair on the mother, unfair on the father who is being made to feel unimportant. He needs to bond too.” With most dads wanting to play a significant role in the early days of their child’s life, Annie questioned why they weren’t being given every opportunity to do so ninehoney reports.

Comments on Annie’s tweet revealed that many couples find the rule distressing. “My husband was sent home, I had our first at a little birthing centre,” one mum wrote. “He got me settled in my room and then had to leave. He said it was the oddest night of his life going from euphoria to solitude.”

Another mum pointed out the social implications of preventing fathers from staying with their partner and baby in the days after birth. “We have to get fathers involved from day one (if they are around) so that we address gender inequality and get more women back to work.”

We think many women would love the chance to have their partner beside them every step of the way. The days after birth can be some of the most difficult and nothing can replace that kind of support.

Was your partner allowed to stay with you on the post-natal ward? Share your story in the comments.


  • I would’ve benefited with my first, I had an emergency c-section and horrible anxiety which I was plagued with for years before and after, and I hated being alone. Especially when my first 2 were in special care. Very daunting. But I got through it, and I’m now happily single and it’s actually helped my anxiety.

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  • In some hospitals the Dads are allowed to stay for a few hours. Visitors are allowed less visiting time even during visiting hours than the Dads are. It has been that way for at least 35 years. Let’s face it, the Mum needs some undisturbed sleep while baby is asleep to re-build her strength up. In most cases now Mum and baby go home in 2 days anyway.

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  • the hospital i was at for my first there was no leave time for the father’s the day/night bub was born, at 4am a family came in after having bub and kept the whole room awake all night. I think private room or private hospital only

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  • Abso friggin lutely!
    It’s his child as much as the mothers. In this day and age we need as much help as we can get. It was absolutely heart breaking seeing my hubby have to leave after our first son was born. He texted me all night saying how much he missed us both and how he cried himself to sleep. So heartbreaking. Thankfully we had a family room for our second and he was able to stay.

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  • I think it is a great and very important time for fathers to bond with their babies. I feel they need to be included more and feel special too. To help their partners after the birth too. Give them such great physical and mental support.

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  • I agree! We would probably see a reduction in post natal depression in some cases if dads were allowed to stay on the ward! Mums need help in the first few days, more help usually then what the midwives can provide!

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  • I agree with comments that it would only work in a private room. Definitely was essential for me to have support though.

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  • Unfortunately I suspect the health system could not cover the cost of extra beds and food.


    • I don’t think the health system shouldn’t have to cover that, those costs should be payed by the dads who stay on the ward



      • I agree and that should indeed be researched – a good idea – well done!

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  • My husband stayed with me all the time, but we had a private room.

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  • I can see both sides, in a 4 bedded room do you really want 8 adults and 4 babies. Sounds like a recipe for disaster

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  • It’s only for a few days, there’s hospital staff on hand to help mum if it’s needed. If you can get a private room. I see no issue. But I fail to see how this would be able to happen on a shared ward. There’s other mums to consider there who may not be comfortable sharing a room with strange men. And honestly, hospitals and the health system is struggling to take care of sick people, without being expected to supply beds for healthy dads

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  • In the case of a private room this shouldn’t be a problem, but in the case of a shared room I would think it’s inappropriate to have multiple man staying there.

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  • Its a hospital. Not a hotel. Mum gets to stay because her body just went through the trauma of birth and needs to recover. Our health system is already screwed up enough with people waiting months for urgently needed procedures. Money should be invested into beds for them before beds for perfectly healthy dads.

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  • I totally agree they should. It’s hard for us mums and we need all the support we can

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  • If you have a single room then I think it’s appropriate.
    When I had my first son (stillbirth) my husband stayed with me during my hospital stay and with my daughter I was lucky enough to have a single room and he was also allowed to stay but meals were not provided for him. For my son ( now 9mo) I was told if I chose to stay the night he would have to go home because there was only shared rooms but that didn’t matter as I went home 4hrs after the delivery.

    Reply

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